Day #12

Inheritance

after Cassandra de Alba

Slivers of soap marking years like tree rings
fused into a pillar;

a collection of clown figurines glowering
over the duct-taped couch;

glass, marble, and plastic eggs
embossed with Florida
and Eloise;

jars caked in ancient dust, a coffee can rattling
baby teeth, yellowed newspapers barking
the end of the war

one day
all of this can be yours

NaPoWriMo Update

So I’ve been writing a lot, but most pieces I’ve been working on are intensely personal. I have elected to leave them off of the internet.

Something I’m doing differently this NaPo around is reading actual books of poetry to supplement my own writing. Matthew Olzmann’s Mezzanines, Kristen Stone’s Domestication Handbook, and Natasha Trethewey’s everything have really helped get my blood pumping.

Day #3

Funeral for Home

Watercolor paper stacked
rough as old hands–
heater grates open
to a desert.

Florence Boulevard smolders
in inch-deep volcano ash–
thick merlot carpet
petrifies like bone.

A ghost kicks dirt
in the basement. Long
hairs drizzle the bathtub.

Hornets lull the dead,
fruit drops and worms feast.

5 Words to NEVER Use in Poetry

Another in the JBAC series–this time, gearing up for NaPoWriMo. I’m still considering if I will participate, but I’m leaning yes. I need something to rev my poetry into high gear, and last time I participated (in 2012), I ended up with half of my creative writing thesis.

There are many things worthy of a poem: the weather, an especially delicious cupcake, the erotic whoosh of a freshly laundered cotton dress, dreams. In truth, the realm of the poetic is wide open to discovery and exploration (of the non-colonizing variety, please).

However, there do remain things that should never be touched by the long fingers of poetry. These things may be tantalizing, omnipresent, and even inescapable; yet this does not mean that they belong in a poem. This is a list of five words that should never under any circumstances find their way into a poem.

Continue reading “5 Words to NEVER Use in Poetry”